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The Hanging Gardens of Adams Ave

After two years of loyal service, our hanging terrariums here at the Sage offices were in need if a refresh. Want to try your own? Pigment, on 30th street in North Park, has all the supplies you need to make your own creative little mini world, full of color. 

Lawnless front yards part one



One of the questions I get most often is how to pull off the front yard with no lawn. A lot of people love the idea of saving water and being more environmentally responsible, but just can’t get a clear picture for what that would look like and how it could possibly be beautiful. So I’m going to start scouting beautiful lawnless front yards in and around San Diego.

This is one on a steep hill in Point Loma. The house itself has a slightly Asian appearance. I love how they pulled off a beautiful front yard with only four different types of plants: Loropetalum Razzleberry, Plectranthus, Black pine, and a groundcover echeveria. 

Crane day!



Who says rocks can’t fly? 

The crane drivers at Southwest Boulder and Stone are magicians with a crane. They can twist, tilt, and rotate the boulder with amazing precision. Then the guys at JCMS Landscape move the dirt under the rock until it sits just-so. When it is all finished, we’ll have a natural garden bench!

Outdoor daybeds: a hot trend in outdoor living

I’m a big book nerd and love to read for hours on end, so to me an outdoor daybed sounds like a dream come true. I have been noticing that a lot more of my clients are asking for a cozy spot to nap, read, and lounge outdoors. So what do you think? Should we add outdoor bedroom to our list of popular outdoor rooms?

The daybed shown here is by Justin Long Design of Sydney Australia.

I love selecting boulders

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When it comes to choosing boulders, my favorite place by far is Southwest Boulder & Stone. Don’t be fooled by their smaller lot in Pacific beach, their large lot outside Fallbrook is the way to go. The pile of boulders in this photo is one of about 20 varieties of boulders that you can choose from, and they will let you pick any boulder in the pile, even if it is on the bottom.

When you choose your rocks, start by deciding whether you would like one that is smooth and rounded or jagged and rough. That will let you eliminate 50% of the options. Then start looking at color and texture of the stone. If you want the boulder to look natural in the landscape, you will need to bury at least one third of it, so you need to select boulders that are larger than the final desired result.

In this case, we were looking for boulders to use as casual seating, so they needed one side that was flattish and smooth-ish. I think it is tons of fun climbing around on all the rock piles!